Question of the Day – No. 385

In your opinion, why do people get angry?

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60 thoughts on “Question of the Day – No. 385

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  1. Anger is a very normal human emotion, we all feel it from time to time. But how each person deals with it says the most about what is in the individuals heart. A person not in control of their own spirit or actions are often the ones lash out in anger. At the end of the day, only we as individuals are in control of our own actions and no one else’s. That really pisses many people off.

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  2. Feelings are what control us as humans ,same time we can control them but it requires mastery of mind . there are underlying feelings of anger in everyone and what springs that up is words . the place a person speak from can spring up the anger in us . one can speak from a ignorant place with a harsh tone and it could actually spring up the anger of the listener . words actually makes us angry

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      1. I think so. It’s either that, or we get sad. From personal experience, for example, I get over a relationship faster when I get angry, rather than when I am sad. Which is sad.

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  3. There a multitude of reasons why people would become angry or feel anger. It is a natural emotion built into us. Does one let that specific emotion run rampant? I.e., flying off the handle, losing our cool, wishing ill upon another person, etc. That, in my opinion, isn’t a healthy way of utilizing it, and can be quite damaging to both the self and others. If we can see it as a tool to shape our purpose, show us the things we wish to see changed, and respond to it in a way that holds value, perhaps we’d be better off. Letting anger present to us the things we dislike isn’t all that bad. From my perspective, bullying, racism, bringing others down, hatred are just a few of things that would make me angry. Not at all a negative if I choose to make the world a better place based off my dislike on those things that are discouragingly negative and toxic. How do we use our anger, that is the important question.

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  4. I think it is often down to feeling inadequate, that maybe you have done something wrong, not done enough, especially if it to someone you love. I think this can often tap into childhood in many ways but often ways where we felt let down, or rejected……just some of my thoughts and one take on it.

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    1. I think that if it’s something we did, we can somehow “fix” it by apologizing in a nice way or by taking some corrective actions. If it comes from others, we can only change the way we see things…

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  5. Expectations (too many and too high), lack of self-awareness, tendency to complain, selfishness. Then there’s also the 20% of situations in which it is totally right to get angry, because you don’t tolerate injustice, because something unfair happened to you, etc.

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  6. Frustration, I think is a huge trigger of anger. Whether it’s another’s action or the result of things not going “as planned” – frustration taps anger hard. It can be used to motivate, if one is willing. There’s also the “O’d rather be mad than sad” mindset. Sometimes it’s less painful to be angry than be hurt.

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      1. I believe there are universal boundaries/personal spaces, including our own God given ownership of our own hearts and minds, and that these limits are set by God — in Christian terms it’s sometimes called ‘Free Will’. It’s also been said that God is a gentleman, He ‘stands at the door and knocks’ and even He is careful to not enter where He is not invited. So, I think we can ‘know’ intuitively when someone is being invasive, often times a telltale sign that someone has crossed, or attempted to cross, into the territory of mind control or other personal affronts– is a flare of anger inside over the injustice of that. It isn’t just about us-it’s about others experience such injustice as well.
        For instance, I feel that flare of anger inside when witnessing a parent publicly berating a child, in a verbally abusive or emotionally abusive tone. The key is not in never feeling that anger–that would be sad to become that numb. I think it is about figuring out how to channel the energy of that anger into something beneficial for God and humanity.

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